February 2014 ERMGC Men's Club Newsletter

Encinitas Ranch Men's Golf Club Newsletter


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Club Membership

The Encinitas Ranch Men's Golf Club (ERMGC) is open to all applicants, 18 years of age and older. The $95 new membership fee includes membership in the Southern California Golf Association (SCGA) and a handicap index. Your membership also allows you to play in our monthly Sunday tournaments as well as our Wednesday sweeps, which is a weekly event that you can win scrip for the golf shop. All applicants, NEW and RENEWALS, must fill out this online form completely every year and all application fees are valid for the entire 2014 calendar year.




Tournament News

Tournament: 2014 2-Man Scramble, February 16th

Sponsored by: Shadowridge Country Club

Format: 2-Man teams. Each team member hits from the tee on each hole. The team selects one of the tee shots and all team members hit from that location. The procedure is repeated until the ball is holed. The winner is the team with the lowest score for 18 holes. The Championship Flight plays to scratch. Team handicaps (as described below) will be subtracted from gross scores in the A and B Net flights.

To register for this tournament go to: Registration

2013 Defending Champions

  • Championship Flight: KEN MERSCHEIM/TODD LAIRD
  • A Flight: JOHN FAMULARE/WILLIAM TURNER
  • B Flight: SEAN GALLEHER/SCOT SAMUELSON
  • C Flight: JEREMY LYONS/JASON FRANK



Tournament Results

2014 January Stroke Play Results

January 26, 2014

Sponsored by:

The Men's Club would like to thank John Gothard and Freewaters for sponsoring the 2013 ERMGC Stroke Play Golf Tournament.

You can now look at all the stats, both from you and other players, from the tournaments, starting with this one, by going to the GHIN results page

Results

Championship Flight

  1. DAVID BARKER
  2. JAMES MCCOY
  3. JEREMY STEIDING

Longest Drive: JAMES MCCOY
Closest to the Hole: TODD LAIRD

A Flight

  1. LOREN WARBURG
  2. DALE CLARK
  3. JOHN GOTHARD

Longest Drive: LOGAN ANDERSON
Closest to the Hole: JAMES HEISER

B Flight

  1. LOU KESSING
  2. SEAN GALLEHER
  3. RICHARD WEBSTER

Longest Drive: ROY CAMPOS
Closest to the Hole: LOU KESSING

C Flight

  1. HARRY A HOUSE
  2. HENRY LOGAN
  3. RICH BUSBY

Longest Drive: HENRY LOGAN
Closest to the Hole: RICH BUSBY

Click here for complete results



Membership

Please join us in welcoming the following
new members to the Club:

  • STEVE STEINAU
  • DREW DEAL
  • DANNY DAO
  • DEREK BERG
  • ROY CAMPOS
  • ROBERT WEEKS
  • GORSON RANTZE
  • CRAIG WOOD
  • DALE WILSON
  • DAVIS HYDE
  • DALE WILSON
  • MIKE BENDIX
  • DAVID SLOAN
  • JAMES CUTRI
  • JEREMY STEIDING



The Rules Column


“Rule 27-2 Provisional Ball”

This Rule allows a player to play another ball “provisionally” when there is reason to believe that his original ball may be lost outside a water hazard or may be out of bounds. The sole purpose of the provisional ball is to save time. This rule normally does not permit playing a provisional when your ball is played into a water hazard, because Rule 26 Water Hazards takes precedence and provides for a full range of options. (More on the water hazard issue later.)

The provisional must be played before you or your partner goes forward to search for the original. A revised Rules Decision (27-21/1.5) was put into effect on January 1, 2014 which clarifies what is meant by “goes forward to search” relative to this Rule. The Decision states that you may not go forward more than approximately 50 yards before you are considered to have gone forward to search and therefore may not return to play a provisional.

When you decide to play a provisional ball, you must announce your intention by informing your opponent (match play) or fellow-competitor (stroke play) that you will play a provisional. It is important to say the word “provisional” before playing another ball. Simply stating “that one could be lost” or “I better reload” is not adequate, and a ball played subsequently becomes your ball in play under penalty of stroke and distance –your original ball is deemed to be lost. It is also a good practice to announce a distinction between the original and the provisional, by saying something like, “The original was a Quantum 1 and the provisional is a Quantum 3.” Without such distinction, you might play both balls into the same area and be unable to identify which is the original and which is the provisional. (This would not be good—see Decision 27/11 for solutions.)

Note that the rule allows for playing a provisional when your original may be lost ‘outside a water hazard’. This means that you may play a provisional if you can’t determine without going forward whether your original might be in the hazard or might be lost outside of the hazard. Let’s say that your original is headed toward an area where there is tall grass, shrubs, trees, AND a water hazard. You are entitled to play a provisional even though your original may have gone into the hazard, because the original may be lost outside the hazard.

In the circumstance above, you play a provisional then go forward to search for the original. On arriving in the area where your original is expected to be, you search but cannot find the ball. If it is NOT KNOWN OR VIRTUALLY CERTAIN that your ball is in the water hazard, you must proceed with the provisional—that is, your original is deemed to be lost. You cannot assume that your original is in the hazard and drop a ball under Rule 26 Water Hazards. Why? Your original may be hidden in the tall grass, or may have struck a tree and deflected across the adjacent fairway, or might have become lodged in one of the flax plants nearby.

Provisional balls are often played from the tee, but may be played from anywhere on the golf course—even from a water hazard or a bunker. When playing from the tee, your provisional may be teed anywhere within the defined teeing ground. When playing from anywhere else, the provisional must be dropped as near as possible to the spot from which the original was played, but no nearer to the hole than that spot.

Let’s say that you correctly announced and played a provisional ball. When does the provisional become the “ball in play” and when must it be abandoned?

You may play the provisional until you reach the place where your original is likely to be. For example: If you crushed your original 280 yards but it could be OB, and your provisional was topped about 150 yards down the middle, you should play another stroke with the provisional before going forward to search for the original. If both balls were hit to about the same distance from the hole, be sure to determine the status of the original before playing the provisional. If you play the provisional from the point where the original is likely to be or a point nearer to the hole than that place, it becomes the “ball in play” and your original is deemed to be lost (and must not be played if even if found in bounds).

Your original is the “ball in play” if it is found in bounds. At that point, the provisional must be abandoned and any strokes played with the provisional are not counted. It can happen that you find the original in bounds but in a bad lie, and would prefer to continue play with the provisional under stroke and distance penalty. Sorry, but this is not an option—you cannot “declare” the original ball to be lost and proceed with the provisional.

There are a few exceptions and notes to Rule 27-2 Provisional Ball, and it would be good to look at the full text of the Rule. Here is a link to the Rule on the USGA website: http://www.usga.org/Rule-Books/Rules-of-Golf/Rule-27/#27-2

Also, Encinitas Ranch Men’s Golf Club uses a local rule (seldom used at other courses) which allows the play of a provisional ball on holes #8 and #17 when you cannot determine if your tee ball has cleared the marked water hazards ahead of you. This will be the subject of a future Rules article.

Dick Beckman – January 2014




Wednesday Sweeps

Wednesday Play for ERMGC Members

If you want friendly golf competition and have a chance to earn gift certificates to purchase items from the Golf Shop, sign up for a tee time between 7:00 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. on Wednesdays. You may sign up as a single, with a friend, or a group of four. All sign-ups must be members of the Men’s Club. All participants pay an entry fee of $5. Each participant signs up for his appropriate flight and tee.

Every golfer can win a gift certificate redeemable at the pro shop for placing in their flight.
In addition, every player has an opportunity to win a $10 gift certificate for being closest to the hole, or having the long drive in their flight.

Also, on the first Wednesday of each month you have an opportunity to place a wager in our "Beat the Pro" contest. Whatever amount you wager, if your net score beats the pro you will get a gift certificate equal to double your wager. If your net score ties or loses to the pro, you still get a certificate equal to the amount you have wagered. You can’t lose!

The following are flight parameters for tee assignments:

Flight Tees Index Score
Championship Blue N/A Gross
A Net Blue 10.0 and lower Net
B Net Green 10.1 to 15.0 Net
C Net White 15.1 and higher Net

Visit our website for additional information on ERMGC Wednesday Play. www.ermgc.org

Hope to see you on Wednesdays. Support your Men's Club and hone your golf skills through friendly competition.

Rich Busby – Wednesday Play Chairman